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1955 International Harvester I.H. Lighted,Light Up Clock,Sign,Dualite,Glass Dome

We find the most interesting Vintage Sign. Here are the best deals we found for the 1955 International Harvester I.H. Lighted,Light Up Clock,Sign,Dualite,Glass Dome for sale on the Internet.

Current Price: $101.00

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1955 International Harvester I.H. Lighted,Light Up Clock,Sign,Dualite,Glass Dome Picture(s) and Description:

 605611608649804500 1955 International Harvester I.H. Lighted,Light Up Clock,Sign,Dualite,Glass Dome

1955 International Harvester I.H. Lighted,Light Up Clock,Sign,Dualite,Glass Dome. Clock was covered in years of grime so it has been cleaned up some. Didnt go to extreme in fear of damaging something. Noticed when apart that the clock was dated 1955 inside. Runs, lights up and keeps time. Made by the Dualite Clock Company of Cincinnati, Ohio. Measures 15 inches across with a reverse painted advertising dial and a glass bubble covering the dial. Setting the clock is a little tricky but does set and works OK. This antique Clock seems to be quiet right now but no guarantee it will be without noise after shipped. These Old clocks were never intended to be used in homes so they were never perfectly quiet. This is out of my field so see photos and ask questions as what you see is the exact item you will receive. POSTAGE INCLUDES DOUBLE BOXED FULLY INSURED SHIPPING IN THE USA. YES I will ship to Japan. Just pay any additional postage....... Sold just as found. As is where is so know what you are bidding on. Stated postage is for the continental United States Only. Foreign postage will be more and calculated at the end of the auction. HISTORYFounding of the company The roots of International Harvester run to the 1830s, when Cyrus Hall McCormick, an inventor from Virginia finalized his version of a horse-drawn reaper, which he field-demonstrated throughout 1831, and for which he received a patent in 1834. Together with his brother Leander J. McCormick (1819–1900), McCormick moved to Chicago in 1847 and started the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company. The McCormick reaper sold well, partially as a result of savvy and innovative business practices. Their products came onto the market just as the development of railroads offered wide distribution to distant market areas. He developed marketing and sales techniques, developing a vast network of trained salesmen able to demonstrate operation of the machines in the field. McCormick died in 1884, with his company passing to his son, Cyrus McCormick, Jr. In 1902 the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company and Deering Harvester Company, along with three smaller agricultural equipment firms (Milwaukee; Plano; and Warder, Bushnell, and Glessner—manufacturers of Champion brand) merged to create the International Harvester Company. In 1919, the Parlin and Orendorff factory in Canton, Illinois was a leader in the plow manufacturing industry. International Harvester purchased the factory calling it the Canton Works; it continued production for many decades.The golden years of IH In 1926 IH's Farmall Works began production in a new plant in Rock Island, Illinois, built solely to produce the new Farmall tractor. By 1930, the 100,000th Farmall was produced. IH next set their sights on introducing a true 'general-purpose' tractor designed to satisfy the needs of the average US family farmer. The resulting 'letter' series of Raymond Loewy-designed Farmall tractors in 1939 proved a huge success, and IH enjoyed a sales lead in tractors and related equipment that continued through much of the 1940s and 1950s, despite stiff competition from Ford, John Deere and other tractor manufacturers. In 1946 IH acquired a World War II defense plant in Louisville, Kentucky, which was enlarged, expanded, and re-equipped for production of the Farmall A, B, and the new 340 tractors. In 1974, the 5 millionth IHC tractor was produced at the Rock Island Farmall plant. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, despite good sales, IH's profit margins remained slim. The continual adding of unrelated business lines created a somewhat unwieldy corporate organization, and the company found it difficult to focus on a primary business, be it agricultural equipment, construction equipment, or truck production. An overly conservative management, combined with a rigid policy of in-house promotions tended to stifle new management strategies as well as technical innovation. Products with increasingly ancient technology continued in production year after year despite their marginal addition to sales. Worse, IH now not only faced a threat of stiff competition in each of its main corporate businesses, but also had to contend with greatly increased production costs, primarily due to labor and government-imposed environmental and safety regulations.

 605611608649804501 1955 International Harvester I.H. Lighted,Light Up Clock,Sign,Dualite,Glass Dome
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